How Television and Video Game Exposure Affects our Kids
How Television and Video Game Exposure Affects our Kids

Show: Healthy Children - The Talk Show for Parents


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Guest(s)
Edward L. Swing, MS
Topic
Children and Video Game Exposure
Topic Info
Television viewing has been associated with attention problems in children. A new study, “Television and Video Game Exposure and the Development of Attention Problems,” published in the August print issue of Pediatrics (published online July 5), found a similar effect for video games. Researchers assessed 1,323 children in third, fourth and fifth grades over 13 months, using reports from the parents and children about their video game and television habits, as well as teacher reports of attention problems. Another group of 210 college students provided self-reports of television habits, video game exposure and attention problems. Researchers found children who exceeded the 2 hours per day of screen time recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics were 1.5 to 2 times more likely to be above average in attention problems. Furthermore, early adults showed a similar association, suggesting that early video game exposure may have lasting consequences.

Edward Swing M.S. comes on the show to discuss the study that states that television viewing has been associated with attention problems in children. He will discuss its impact on the development of attention problems in children.
Guest Info
Edward Swing is a graduate student in the Psychology Department at Iowa State University currently working toward a PhD. His research focuses on video game effects on attention and aggression. He earned an MS in Psychology from Iowa State University (Ames, Iowa) in August 2008 and a BA in Psychology from the College of St. Scholastica (Duluth, Minnesota) in May 2005. Edward Swing grew up in Duluth, Minnesota. He is married to Berna Gercek Swing, also a graduate student in the Psychology Department at Iowa State University.
Host
Melanie Cole, M.S.
20100705/1027kh3c.mp3
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